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Get the latest information and insights on retirement planning and 401k investing from the experts at Ubiquity Retirement & Savings. Get important news that can affect your retirement, along with tips and advice from our team of experts. Call Ubiquity today for a Free Consultation at 855.466.5825.

Nothing is certain except death, taxes, and market volatility.

As part of our new program, CensiblyYours Financial Wellness Tools, we’ve partnered with Kaye Captial Management to help make you make smarter investment decisions. We spoke with their investment experts about ways for retirement savers to survive the market’s ups and downs.

In general, how do market downturns impact 401k accounts?

Investing in the stock market comes with inherent risks, including market volatility. One key to mitigating these risks is to take a long-term approach to investing. Retirement plans, like 401ks, should be seen as long-term investments that can handle market downturns, especially for younger participants. Think about the mountain of a stock market graph—although there are fluctuations downward, the general trend is positive. As such, sit tight with market downturns, because a well-diversified portfolio should net a positive return over the long term.

For individuals closer to retirement, choose assets with less risk to maintain principal. Because you have a shorter time horizon, selecting lower risk assets may not generate a high yield, but should help you retire comfortably by preserving principal.

How should 401k investors react to market volatility?

Market fluctuations are part of the game when it comes to investing. If you are properly diversified and you are able to stomach the volatility, you will be better off in the long-term.

Participants who are not in target date funds or models should rebalance their portfolios during market volatility to make sure their accounts have appropriate risk parameters.

How does market volatility impact retirement savers over 50, or those close to retirement?

Market volatility is more impactful for those over 50 because they have a shorter time horizon for investment than younger participants. However, those over 50 tend to know what it’s like to go through market fluctuations, so they understand that although the market can be is volatile short-term, investing for the long-term can contribute to the growth of your nest egg. A participant over 50 is better served to invest in less-risky assets to preserve their principal. By doing so, they mitigate the potential for a major crash just before retirement.

People close to retirement do not have the luxury of waiting out volatility. Older savers should look at their total portfolio risk exposure and decide if they are comfortable with the risks they are taking in their portfolios.

What steps should retirement savers take now to prepare for a potential market downturn?

Rebalance your portfolios, or ensure your investment third party accommodates automatic rebalancing, to ensure proper diversification to mitigate short-term market downturns. Modern portfolio theory dictates that diversifying your portfolio among asset classes allows for a much more consistent and stable return on investment. Rebalancing annually also ensures the participant that they are properly diversified.

Savers should consistently monitor their portfolios and rebalance them to the correct risk tolerance they believe is right for them. You cannot predict a market turndown, but you can prepare by ensuring your portfolio has the appropriate amount of risk for the return you expect.

Generally, how important a consideration is age when planning for retirement as part of a couple? Is this something couples tend to overlook?

Investing early, and often as a couple, can dramatically impact your success for retirement and is often overlooked at a young age. Compounding interest generated over time benefits those who save early and can put you well ahead of your peers, helping you retire on time.

More important than age is creating a financial plan and sticking to it. Understanding where your money is going on a daily basis and creating a plan for the future is necessary for success. Each person is different; some want to work until they are 70 while others want to retire at 60. Creating a plan and sticking to it will help couples identify the best time to retire.

What value does a partnership with Ubiquity provide to your company?

Ubiquity provides a comprehensive financial planning product through the CensiblyYours solution. This solution helps employees allocate their retirement money based on the level of risk appropriate for their age, while providing a financial planning tool to help employees hit their retirement goals.


This blog serves as information material from Kaye Capital Management (“KCM”) and does not serve as investment advice or recommendations by KCM or Ubiquity Retirement + Savings (“KCM”). Please remember that past investment performance is not be indicative of future results.  Different types of investments are associated with varying degrees of risk, and there can be no assurance that the future performance of any specific investment, investment strategy, or product (including the investments and/or investment strategies recommended or undertaken by Kaye Capital Management (“KCM”), or any non-investment related content, made reference to directly or indirectly in this newsletter will be profitable, equal any corresponding indicated historical performance level(s), be suitable for your portfolio or individual situation, or prove successful.  Due to various factors, including changing market conditions and/or applicable laws, the content may no longer be reflective of current opinions or positions. Moreover, you should not assume that any discussion or information contained in this newsletter serves as the receipt of, or as a substitute for, personalized investment advice from KCM or Ubiquity.  To the extent that a reader has any questions regarding the applicability of any specific issue discussed above to his/her individual situation, he/she is encouraged to consult with the professional advisor of his/her choosing.  Both Ubiquity and KCM are neither law firms nor certified public accounting firms and no portion of the newsletter content should be construed as legal or accounting advice.  A copy of the KCM’s current written disclosure Brochure discussing their independent advisory services and fees is available upon request. Ubiquity is not affiliated with any independent services you may solicit from KCM.

This week we were excited to announce the launch of CensiblyYours Financial Wellness Tools, our newest innovation to help small business employers and employees make the most of their retirement plan and improve their overall financial health.

As part of our new suite of offerings, we’re providing participating savers access to Edukate, a fintech benefits platform that empowers employees through personalized financial education and guidance. So what exactly is financial wellness and how does it create a more productive, engaged workforce? We sat down with the experts at Edukate to discuss how investing in your employees’ financial well-being can set your business apart in the marketplace.

Define what financial wellness means to Edukate.

The concept of financial wellness can be a bit overwhelming as there are a number of definitions out there.

At Edukate, we believe financial wellness is the relationship between a person and their money.

A financially healthy employee is actively managing their day to day spending, is confident as to how they can protect themselves from future unexpected life events and is saving for their financial freedom.

How can companies adopt and promote financial wellness in 2019?

Open enrollment isn’t the only time you can make a difference in how your employees interact with their benefits.

Platforms like Edukate are breaking the mold of having to roll out benefits during open enrollment. The majority of Edukate’s plans are implemented outside of an open enrollment period.

When you’re looking for a financial wellness benefit, it’s important to find a platform that meets the specific needs of your organization.

For example, if employees aren’t participating in your 401k, find out why. Employees may cite reasons such as not fully understanding the program or that they have other financial concerns they want to address first.

A strong financial wellness platform for your organization can educate users on how to use their 401k program and how they can tackle other debts or financial stressors to be able to start participating.

Typically, employees only hear about voluntary benefits right after launch or when they’re just starting at a company. To keep employees engaged, we recommend quarterly campaigns to ensure employees understand and feel empowered to use their benefits.

What are the key components to a company’s financial wellness program?

Like any benefit, a financial wellness program should be easy to access, administer, and use.

At Edukate, we focus on three key areas for success.

The first is employee engagement. Many employees never engage with their benefits because they’re boring and uninviting. By offering personalized guidance and interactive content, we’ve rethought employee engagement from the ground up.

The next is platform scalability. Edukate makes it easy to customize your employees’ experience, communicate with them, and get in-depth insights into how they are doing.

Lastly, is system integration. We are a one-stop benefits destination for employees by providing guidance for financial challenges and connecting them with the employer benefits that matter to them most— all while cultivating a culture of positive wellness.

Why is financial wellness important for employee retention?

There are plenty of statistics about how financial stress affects employee engagement and productivity.

When an employee is disengaged at work, the organization suffers. Lackluster productivity, absenteeism, and negative attitudes are common side effects.

When you offer benefits that employees need and want, they’re more likely to use them.

And if those benefits can help employees reduce their financial stress, productivity and engagement increases. When employees feel empowered by their benefits offerings, sentiments about their employer increase as well.

For some employees, this favorable perception of their employer drives loyalty to the organization.

The same survey also found that many employees would prefer more robust benefits offerings over an increase in salary.

Happy employees are productive employees.

How does achieving financial wellness work in tandem with saving for retirement?

Edukate’s approach to financial wellness is to help employees navigate every aspect of their financial lives, including managing their spending and saving habits, preparing for the future, and saving for retirement.

By helping employees address their financial stressors and feel more confident with their financial decisions, we believe that employees can better prepare for the future.

As employees learn about their personal finances, Edukate recommends existing employer benefits like retirement accounts to help them achieve their goals.

How does Edukate help promote financial wellness, and what inspired the company to pursue this mission?

Edukate was created with a belief that traditional retirement and financial education are broken and that there were better ways to help employees achieve their financial goals.

At Edukate, we empower employees to practice confident decision making to best utilize the benefits that matter to them most.

We accomplish this by offering an exceptional online platform that connects employees with education, tools, and benefits most relevant to their needs.

What has been the biggest barrier for small business to provide financial wellness benefits?

Even though financial wellness benefits can provide a positive return on investment, securing budget for a new benefits platform can be tough.

When working with small businesses, we work to find ways to rollout financial wellness in phases to different employee groups to give HR managers room to grow the program over time.

Why was a partnership with Ubiquity important to your company?

Partnering with Ubiquity offered Edukate a way to scale a financial wellness resource to smaller employers.

We recognize the need for small business owners to provide robust benefits to their employees. Nearly 90% of employees in the US work for employers with fewer than 20 employees.

Because retirement planning is one of the key focus areas of Edukate’s platform, partnering with Ubiquity helps us connect employees with the resources they need to fully prepare for retirement.

This blog serves as information material from Edukate and does not serve as investment advice or financial recommendations by Edukate or Ubiquity Retirement + Savings (“Ubiquity”). To the extent that a reader has any questions regarding the applicability of any specific issue discussed above to his/her individual situation, he/she is encouraged to consult with and independent professional advisor.  Both Ubiquity and Edukate are neither law firms nor certified public accounting firms and no portion of the newsletter content should be construed as legal or accounting advice.

For as different as Millennials and Baby Boomers are, they have one major thing in common. They both dream of a secure retirement someday.

There has been a lot of talk from retirement experts that millennials won’t be able to retire on time. But when you look at the statistics, the message isn’t as doom and gloom. Millennials are actually saving almost as much for their futures as baby boomers are. Boomers currently save, on average, 9% of their survey, while millennial are saving 8%. Their contributions also increase at a much higher rate than boomers. (Though it’s easy to attribute the discrepancy to the rapid change in salary at the beginning of your career.)

According to The 18th Annual TransAmerica survey, about three in 10 workers have dipped into a retirement account for an early withdrawal or loan from a 401(K) or similar account. Boomers are far more likely to have done so than their younger counterparts. About 36% of Boomers have taken a loan, while the same is true for only 28% of Millennials.

Procrastination is, unsurprisingly, a trend most prevalent among young workers. About 54% of Millennials prefer not to think about retirement investing until they get closer to their retirement date. Among Baby Boomers, significantly closer to their magic retirement age, that number is about 25%.

Want to learn more? See our roundup below!

The looming retirement crisis is a term that sounds ominous – and it is. Millions of Americans dream of a retirement that includes their hobbies and loved ones. Unfortunately, the harsh reality is that many of those dreamers will never actually get to retire because of a seriously inadequate nest egg that is supposed to sustain them through their twilight years.

America needs to wake up and realize we have a serious problem on our hands. It’s not an abstract one, but rather an issue that has specific origins. We have no chance of reversing the problem without figuring out how we got to this point and what we need to do to prevent the looming retirement crisis.

Here are the main obstacles we face:

1. Coverage

Study after study has shown the easiest and most effective way for people to save for retirement is through an employer-sponsored retirement plan, whether it’s a 401k, IRA or another vehicle.

Over 40 million employees – especially those working at small businesses, don’t have access to a work-sponsored retirement savings plan.

Our solution? Mandated retirement savings plans. State governments are getting involved in this solution, but more needs to be done so that all workers have the opportunity to save at work.

2. Participation rates

Even among employees with the opportunity to save at work, there is an alarmingly low participation rate of only 52 percent, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The retirement industry and government need to find a way to get people to utilize their plans and save money for their future. When employees have to opt for a plan, many wrongfully assume they need the money more now than they will later.

Our solution? Auto-enrollment. Research indicates that when people are auto-enrolled in a retirement plan, they stick with it after seeing how easy it is to use and its benefits.

 

 

3. Saving enough

In an earlier post, we discussed the new reality of retirement savings sources: Pensions are basically extinct, and Social Security is unstable. That means you alone are responsible for saving enough to last you through retirement.

The problem is that most people’s nest eggs are underfunded. According to the Employee Benefit Research Institute, 57 percent of workers report that the total value of their family’s savings and investments is less than $25,000 (this figure does not include the equity in their home or a defined benefit plan). Of that group, 28 percent of people have less than $1,000 saved.

Our solution? Auto-increasing savings amounts. For workers enrolled in a defined contribution plan, it is difficult to remember to keep increasing their deferral rate; plus, many people second-guess the decision as they believe they need the money more now than they will later. By auto-escalating deferral rates, we can help people save more without putting the burden on them to elect to save more.

4. Investing appropriately

Investment selection and portfolio allocation both seem to trip up savers very frequently – and with good reason. After all, most people don’t have expertise in the markets, and yet their future ultimately depends on these very complicated concepts and products.

It’s no surprise we are concerned that people are not investing appropriately for their age, risk tolerance or current market conditions. How can you know what is considered appropriate for you when you’re tasked with doing this on your own?

Our solution? Cost-effective professional advice. When there is a plumbing issue in your house, you call a professional plumber. It’s that same logic that should encourage the retirement industry and employers to offer professional resources to assist savers with their investment selection and ensure its suitability for their unique situation and goals.

Download Ubiquity’s Definitive Guide to Small Business 401k

Our book club is currently reading Daniel H. Pink’s To Sell Is Human, and this week’s reading surfaced an interesting tidbit of information: we find it hard to relate to future versions of ourselves.

“To those estranged from their future selves, saving is like a choice between spending money today or giving it to a stranger years from now.” – HERSHFIELD et al.

Is this why so many of us live for today, unknowingly aligning ourselves with the philosophy of Epicurus, which states that pleasure is the greatest good?

We can’t escape the rules of cause-and-effect; what we do today has downstream consequences.

The donuts, the late night ice cream sneaks, the stubborn adherence to a strict policy of no exercise. These choices that I made years ago are affecting me today.

I have proof. I’m sure others can relate.

What, then, can be done to save our future self? Are we doomed to forgo sacrifice instead of pleasure, planning instead of impulse?

No.

“Light Strokes, Fell great Oaks.” – Benjamin Franklin

Just as my impulsive behavior years ago is the bane of my waist-line today, the Krispy Cremes, baby back ribs and el grande pork burritos I eat or do not eat today could harangue my figure a year from now.

If I make small modifications and compromises, like eating light meals two or three times a week, forgoing a $4.50 mocha, maybe not eating out as much, and possibly using the extra money I save to invest in my 401(k) plan, and maybe, just maybe running around the block a few times a week and doing push-ups before going to sleep, I might be in better shape a decade from now had I not made these small adjustments.

What do you think? If you can take a small series of actions that lead to a great payoff, would you do it?

Will you?

What can you do if you need cash, don’t have adequate savings, and taking out a loan from a bank or friend isn’t an option? What if you are trying to buy your first home and are coming up short for the down payment? Many people turn to a 401k loan, that allows you to borrow the money you’ve already invested.

While it is your money, it is important to note it takes people about three weeks to receive their loan. Plus, before you can get a loan it has to be approved by both your 401k provider and your employer. So if you need money right away, this might not the best option for you.

Additionally, since this is a workplace benefit offered through your current employer, it’s not wise to take out a loan if you plan on leaving your job in the next few years. Here are some things to think about:

1. Personal vs. residential loans

A residential loan can be used for purchasing your first home or primary residence. Your employer and even the IRS may be more lenient with this type of loan and give you up to 15 years to pay it back.

A personal loan can be used for almost anything, including student debt, a new car, healthcare expenses, etc. You may only have five years to pay off a personal loan.

No matter what type of loan you take, the minimum you can withdraw from your 401k is $1,000, and the maximum is half of your current balance or $50,000.

2. Interest

You may be thinking, why do I have to pay interest on a loan I took from myself? The IRS wants you to pay interest to mimic the gains your 401k could have made if the money had stayed invested. Your interest rate is calculated by taking the prime rate – the interest rate that banks charge to their most credit-worthy customers – and adding 1 to 2 percent, depending on your provider.

3. Fees

In addition to paying your interest, you will pay some hefty fees. If you are taking a five-year loan, you could pay upward of $500 in fees on top of what you initially borrowed. Why?

First, there is likely an administration fee (sometimes called an “origination fee”) that goes toward drawing up your paperwork, writing the check and transferring your money. After that, there is an annual administration fee to cover the maintenance of your loan.

4. Repayment schedule

Loans are repaid the same way you contribute to your 401k – automatically and through your paycheck. Since this is a workplace benefit and not built to be easily accessible, most providers will only let you have one active loan at a time. This means you need to completely pay off one loan before taking out another from your 401k.

5. Defaulting

Defaulting is when you can’t make your loan payment when it’s due. Like any default, this can have serious financial implications. How can you default if your repayments come directly from your paycheck? One way is if your employment is terminated and you are no longer receiving a paycheck. If that happens, you are required to pay back the full amount of your loan within 60 days, and on top of that, your balance will be taxed and you could even face an early withdrawal penalty if you are under the age of 59 ½.

6. Loan modeling tools

This resource from Bankrate allows you to see how a 401k loan will impact your paycheck and retirement plan. Most importantly, make sure you are prepared for a lower monthly income so you can stay on track to meet any long-term financial goals.

Download Ubiquity’s Definitive Guide to Small Business 401k

Good news – ­it seems the world is finally getting to know us. There is now a plethora of Millennial-focused studies, articles, and apps that cater to our vast, diverse generation and rightfully so, as there are more than 80 million of us in the U.S. alone! Here’s what Millennials need to know about money, whether it’s becoming more familiar with investing, saving or more educated about money, there are resources to help us achieve our goals.

1. Millennials should make these 3 moves now to retire with $1 million

This Money article goes beyond the typical “start saving early” tip that we have all heard. Instead, the piece gives actionable steps we can be taken to retire with a healthy nest egg, such as allocating our portfolios heavily toward stocks. The real gem in this article is the warning to avoid investments laden with fees we may not have even known existed. It’s time to stop wasting our money and start putting it to work for our Future Selves!

 2. Capital one survey uncovers Millennials’ attitudes on spending, saving, and sharing

Ever wonder how your friends viewed money, but couldn’t figure out how to ask? You’re in luck because this recent Capital One survey, entitled Millennial Mindset on Money, asks for us. The study looks at some important questions about finance and privacy, security, personal relationships, and technology—basically everything we care about. For example, did you know more than 14 percent of those surveyed said being a money moocher is a deal breaker when it comes to romantic relationships? How many respondents do you think said they would use Facebook to access their money? Check it out for more eye-opening responses.

 

3. Acorns

Finally, there is a financial management app designed specifically with our needs in mind! In a world where we are faced with mountains of student debt and a high cost of living, it’s easy to feel like we just don’t have extra money to be investing. Acorns allow us to take our spare change from everyday purchases and invest it into one of five diversified portfolios. As an added bonus, we can make unlimited deposits and withdrawals at no cost so our money can be flexible with our unpredictable needs. Acorns is a free app to download, and it costs as little as $1 per month to maintain. Good news students – it’s free for you!

Nathan Bolt is a friendly, helpful, burgeoning young professional with whom I’m speaking about vocations and avocations, passion and happiness, the future, and now.

Victor: Some people have this idea that if they work hard, they get to play hard. On the other side of that there are people who scrounge and scrounge.

Nathan: I think it’s prevalent in our society to kind of live this deferred life plan model, where you work most of your life and maybe take one or two vacations a year with your family, that when you’re 65 or when you retire, that’s really when you get to enjoy yourself. I don’t think that’s for me, because when I’m 65, I don’t think I’ll enjoy the things I would have enjoyed when I’m 25 or 35. While I’m young and active and able to do more things because I’m healthier, that’s when I want to enjoy myself.

But at the same time, you have to think about the future. I think it’s a balance.

Right when I turned 18, I started a Roth IRA.

I can make my budget and contribute my maximum and really make sure that my investments grow over time so that by the time I’m thinking about retiring I’ll be set.

V: Have you ever heard of an avocation? An avocation is something you can be a specialist at that isn’t necessarily a money-maker but something that gives you a work/life balance. For some people, it’s what makes their life worth living. Do you have anything that you’re passionate about?

N: Music, specifically electronic music. Recently I’ve got some DJ equipment, and I started messing around with that.

With my free time, I will be learning how to DJ as a hobby.

When I’m passionate about that I’m just happier in general with my life and that translate into all aspects of it including my vocation.

Happiness goes beyond passion and Nathan understands this, “I’m always the type of person who when in a situation that is hands-on, dealing with people, I’m happy.”

It’s hard for me to say that I’ve met anyone more well-rounded than this confident gentleman.

Crisis? What Crisis?

Andrea Sobotor / 7 Feb 2013 / Ubiquity Insights

I did it. I put my house (crisis) up for sale. Now, I’m doing it FSBO for the moment—but I suspect that I will begin getting hit on by every real estate agent within a 20-mile radius. You want a piece of this? Yeah, you do.

One of my goals in 2013 is to get the heck out of debt and to get substantial savings in place. Another is to reduce the amount of crap I have. And that crap includes my underwater, in foreclosure home, which—by the way—could house a family of 8 comfortably. That being said, I am a family of two. We have about 2,000 more square feet than we could possibly need.

HAPPY NEW YEAR! To me.

So far, I’m off to a bangin’ start for 2013. I’ve increased my contribution limit for my 401k to 10%. <— What?!? YEAH! That just happened! And with that 4% match from my company, I am feeling good that I am working towards securing my future while NOT leaving free money on the table. I love free money. (You complete me, free money!)

The thing is we are in a totally different America than we were in just seven years ago. Getting a $100K credit line (while being totally undeserving of such a thing) is no longer happening. One does not just waddle out and get a home loan without a soaring credit score. I’ll tell you what—I want none of it. You can take your credit and shove it, Wall Street!

I am reimagining my life.

What do I want to be when I grow up? Not a MORON.

How do I get there? I am embarking on an adventure of discovery; one where I am no longer giving into my “I want, what I want, when I want it, which is now” previous attitude. The house needs to go. My kids are in college. The last kid is moving out in a short 6 months  (booo). That means I need to find an apartment or a house to rent. And guess what—maintenance of said house as far as repairs and appliances and taxes? Not my problem.

My house is a money pit.

My taxes every year in this pit are insane. And maintenance of the beast? Don’t even get me started. What I can save conservatively by finding a place for rent will get me out of debt within this next two years. Maybe even one year. And guess what? My house is not my retirement. My retirement plan that is compounding interest.

Resolutions. Why not?

2013 is going to be an awesome year. First off, the Mayan Apocalypse didn’t happen. But the looming retirement crisis still is—so what are you going to do to make sure your future self is secure and happy?

 

You have probably been hearing a lot about the ‘Fiscal Cliff’, our national deficit, the need to raise taxes and lower spending, the sequestration (whatever that is), and the debt ceiling (again).

Let me try and put this in easy to understand terms for us.

I recently came across an illustration that we can all relate to. Instead of talking in billions, and trillions, this illustration uses the magic of the decimal point and chops off a whole bunch of zeros.

Basically, this is the national budget; zeros removed to make it look like a household budget:

Household Income: $21,700
All Expenses: $38,200
Difference: ($16,500)

Amount to be charged to our credit card: $16,500

Existing credit card balance: $142,710

Amount the family has agreed to reduce their spending next year: $385

When stated like this, it makes much more sense, doesn’t it? Or no sense at all, depending on your stance.

This is what we are dealing with:

• Accumulation of massive debt over many years
• Earning too little to support our lifestyle
• Spending more than we are earning
• No will to change our ways

We need to declare enough! For the love of our country, our friends and family, we cannot continue like this!

We’ve been using the credit card when we should have been using the debit card!

We have been pickpocketed, and our credit card is in the hands of Congress, who, in what can only be described as a drunken binge, have run up a huge balance, Republican, and Democrat alike.

And there is another problem! Just like the borrowing limit on your credit card, we as a nation have a borrowing limit, and we have hit it – many times!

So what would you do? Rational, sane people would say wow; we really got ourselves in a bind didn’t we, we better work at cleaning this up.

Non-rational, not so sane people would instead call up the credit card company and ask for more credit.

In our national case, our credit card company is mostly China and Japan. How many more times will they be willing to take that call?

And Congress is calling on our behalf, asking for an increase to our credit card so they can spend more.

Not sure about you, but no one asked me if this is ok. No one from Congress has checked with me if I am ok with increasing the amount I have to pay for this party, and no one has asked me if I am ok making the payments on our national credit card.

I am not ok with it, and I want my credit card back.

The time has come to take control of our futures, and for us to care more! This is it, people, it’s not too late. But it will be soon.

This course is unsustainable. Never before in modern history has there been such a complex mix of a demographics, an aging population, a shrinking tax base, and such a lack of foresight. History tells us our empire will fail; we are close to crossing the point of no return.

Take action. Take control. Stop outsourcing our futures to 535 people in Washington who crave instant gratification, at all costs. Because, like it or not, we are all in this together, and if we do not take serious measures today, this party will be over – one and done.

What do you think about this? Do you get it? Are you pissed?

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© 2019 Ubiquity Retirement + Savings
Privacy Policy
44 Montgomery Street, Suite 3060
San Francisco, CA 94104
Support: 855.401.4357

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